Squish! Squish! Squish! The wildflowers are loving it.

Sea blush adds a cotton-candy color to the rocky knoll behind Nuthatch Cabin. The native wildflower is more prolific than ever this spring on my island.

IT’S A SOGGY SUNDAY on Center Island, continuing a moist and cool spring throughout Western Washington. Halfway through May, Seattle has already recorded 2 1/2 times its historically average rainfall for the month.

Other than the extreme crankiness among Washingtonians who will wave their GORE-TEX-swaddled arms and shout that we get enough friggin’ rain in November, there’s good news and bad news.

The bad news is that invasive grasses and weeds are loving it. My little half-acre of paradise is looking like the 12-year-old kid who hates haircuts after spending a summer with his grandfather who doesn’t see too good. We’re talking shaggy.

Blue camas mingles with other wildflowers by the front step of my writing hut. The starry flower’s bulbs were once a staple in the diet of Northwest tribes, who steamed them like potatoes. Don’t confuse the bulbs with those of the aptly named (and toxic) death camas, which has a spiky cluster of white inflorescence. The two types of camas often grow in close proximity.

The good news is that the wildflowers are going nuts, too. If you get a chance to take a hike soon at Iceberg Point on Lopez, Turtleback Mountain on Orcas, Young Hill on San Juan Island, or just about anyplace in the islands with an open meadow and occasional sunshine, prepare to be wowed. Blue camas flowers, golden buttercups, pink sea blush, chocolate lilies and more have been outdoing themselves this month. I need look only as far as the rocky knoll behind my cabin.

Rain, rain, go away. Soon. But thanks for watering the flowers.

This post is also available on audio. Listen to my Cantwell’s Reef podcast.